Retailer Therapy: Who’s Naughty and Who’s Nice?

In this 2012 report, the Campaign ranked some of the world’s largest retailers on their commitment to cosmetics safety, putting the spotlight on Walmart, Target, Macy’s, CVS, Walgreens, Costco, Kroger and Whole Foods Market.

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Baby’s Tub is Still Toxic

This report documented the presence of carcinogenic formaldehyde-releasing preservatives in Johnson’s Baby Shampoo in some countries (including the U.S.), while formulas sold in other countries were found to be free of these chemicals. The Campaign didn’t give up on J&J and in 2011, the company announced a decision to phase out chemicals linked to cancer and other health problems from its baby and adult cosmetics products in 57 countries around the world.

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Market Shift: The Story About the Compact for Safe Cosmetics and
the Growth in Demand for Safe Cosmetics

Learn about the seven-year period when the Campaign worked with companies in a unique partnership to raise the bar for cosmetic safety and full ingredient disclosure in this 2011 report.

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Not So Sexy: The Health Risks of Secret Chemicals in Fragrance

A rose may be a rose. But that rose-like fragrance in your perfume may be something else entirely, concocted from any number of the fragrance industry’s thousands of chemical ingredients in blends that are almost always kept hidden, according to this 2010 report.

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Pretty Scary: Heavy Metals in Face Paints

A Campaign for Safe Cosmetics report from 2009 revealed some scary findings about children’s Halloween face paints—they contained toxic heavy metals like lead, nickel, cobalt and chromium. Creepier yet, some products even bore misleading claims (like “hypoallergenic” and “FDA compliant”), making it tough for parents to find safe face paints.

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A Little Prettier

In this follow up to the Not Too Pretty report, “A Little Prettier” revealed that at least some segment of the beauty industry had made considerable progress in removing phthalates, a set of industrial chemicals linked to birth defects, asthma, early puberty and decreased sperm counts, while other companies continued to put high levels of phthalates into fragrance.

The 2008 report’s good news: Because of sustained pressure from the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and stricter regulation in the U.S. and abroad, some leading beauty companies were starting to use fewer toxic chemicals.

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Not Too Pretty: Phthalates, Beauty Products and the FDA

In May 2002 a coalition of environmental and public health organizations contracted with a major national laboratory to test 72 name-brand, off-the-shelf beauty products for the presence of phthalates, a large family of hormone disrupting chemicals. The laboratory found phthalates in nearly three-quarters of the products tested. The report findings, which confirmed suspicions by Centers for Disease Control scientists that high levels of phthalates in women could be coming from fragrances and other cosmetics, launched the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics

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